Книги издательства MoMA

Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971
Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971
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  9382  

Edited by Klaus Biesenbach and Christophe Cherix. With contributions by Yoko Ono, Julia Bryan-Wilson, Jon Hendricks, Clive Phillpot, David Platzker, Francesca Wilmott, and Midori Yoshimoto. Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971 examines the beginnings of Ono's career, demonstrating her pioneering role in visual art, performance, and music during the 1960s and early 1970s. It begins in 1960, when Ono initiated a performance series with La Monte Young in her New York loft. Over the course of the decade, Ono earned international recognition, staging Cut Piece in Kyoto, Tokyo, New York, and London, and launching with John Lennon her global campaign WAR IS OVER ! if you want it. Ono returned to New York in the early 1970s and organized an unsanctioned "one woman show" at MoMA. Over forty years later, the Museum presents its first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the artist's work. This accompanying publication features three essays that examine Ono's early years, and five sections organized chronologically to trace the evolution of Ono's artistic practice. Each chapter includes an introduction, artwork descriptions, primary documents, and a selection by the artist of her texts and instruction drawings.

Rauschenberg Sculpture
Rauschenberg Sculpture
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  2238  

"Robert Rauschenberg is one of the greatest sculptors of out time both in the heart of what he has made and in the extensions of its possibilities. (...) In organizing the exhibition I decided to focus only on those works which had no painting element." (Julia Brown Turrell)

Frida Kahlo: Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair
Frida Kahlo: Self-Portrait with Cropped Hair
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  1185  

Though the Surrealists adopted Frida Kahlo as one of their own, the painter maintained that she did ‘not know if my paintings are Surrealist or not, but I do know that they are the most frank expression of myself.’ She produced numerous self-portraits, each one an articulation of different facets of herself and her eventful life. Kahlo painted Self- Portrait with Cropped Hair in the wake of a particularly tumultuous time, just months after she divorced her famous husband, Mexican Muralist painter Diego Rivera. He had always admired her long, dark hair, which, as she indicates in the tresses littering the painting, she had cut off after their split. She also shows herself in an oversized suit resembling the ones that Rivera wore. Through such emotionally and symbolically charged details, Kahlo expresses her feelings about her relationship with Rivera while also asserting her sense of self as an independent artist.

Robert Rauschenberg: Dante's Inferno
Robert Rauschenberg: Dante's Inferno
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  3040  

Published to accompany a major traveling exhibition, this small volume presents the 34 drawings Rauschenberg made for each canto of Dante’s Inferno. Between 1958 and 1960, Robert Rauschenberg made drawings for each of the thirtyfour cantos, or sections, of Dante’s fourteenth-century poem Inferno by using a novel technique to transfer photographic reproductions from magazines or newspapers onto paper. Acquired by The Museum of Modern Art soon after it was completed, the resulting work is his most sustained exercise in the medium of drawing and a testament to Rauschenberg’s desire to bring his experience of the contemporary world into his art. The drawings weave together meditations on public and private spheres, politics and inner life. Above all, they pay homage to creativity in dialogue: each drawing is a conversation with Dante across the centuries. This volume includes newly commissioned poems by Robin Coste Lewis and Kevin Young that offer contemporary responses to Rauschenberg’s celebrated series and an essay by MoMA curator Leah Dickerman that explores its making in depth.