Книги издательства Fontanka

Drawing the Curtain: The Cold War in Cartoons
Drawing the Curtain: The Cold War in Cartoons
 Podpisnie

  4237  

Drawing the Curtain is the compelling story of Soviet and western relations during the Cold War, as told through cartoons and propaganda art. Seventy-five beautifully drawn Soviet cartoons reveal the extraordinary obsessions and ferocious propaganda campaigns of the period. Most of them have never been seen before in the West. The Soviet works are juxtaposed throughout with western cartoons on similar themes. Together they not only reveal one of the Cold War’s most unlikely battlegrounds, but also highlight the remarkable similarities between each side’s depiction of the other. With a foreword by Sergei Khrushchev, son of the Soviet leader at the heart of some of the Cold War’s tensest exchanges, Drawing the Curtain contains essays by Timothy S. Benson, a leading authority on cartoons, and Polly Jones, Fellow in Russian at University College, Oxford. Igor Smirnov, one of the great Russian cartoonists of the 1970s and 80s, provides a glimpse of life as a cartoonist under the Soviet regime. Superbly designed as a book within a book, Drawing the Curtain is part cultural history, part art book. Sometimes funny, sometimes shocking, it offers a very different take on East-West relations in the second half of the twentieth century.

The story of synko-filipko
The story of synko-filipko
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  1770  

This is the second book of Russian folk tales published by Fontanka, following Why the Bear has no Tail and other Russian Folk Tales. Here, too, the illustrations are by the Russian artist Elena Polenova (1850–98; younger sister of artist Vasily Polenov). Polenova believed that Russian children needed beautifully illustrated folk tales akin to those published in Germany and England, and she assembled her own versions from various published and unpublished sources. Her illustrations drew inspiration from expeditions to Russian villages to discover local art traditions. Synko-Filipko and other Russian Folk Tales publishes the remaining tales and rhymes from Polenova’s second and last cycle of illustrations of the 1890s, which have a charming and distinctive style verging on art nouveau. The title story is about a boy carved from a block of wood who outwits Baba Yaga and her daughter Nastaska with the help of flocks of birds flying overhead. A greedy peasant and a wicked stepmother feature in other stories, alongside several rhymes for children. Based on oral traditions, the stories have been translated by Louise Hardiman to evoke their original intention as tales to be read aloud and passed on from one generation to the next.