Книги издательства Actes Sud

Chateau La Coste
Chateau La Coste
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  3367  

A stones throw from Aix-en-Provence is the Chateau la Coste, a unique alliance of wine, architecture and art, dedicated to producing organic wines. At its heart are the Vat room designed by Jean Nouvel and an art centre designed by the great Japanese architect, Tadao Ando. For over a decade, Chateau la Coste has invited artists to find a location on the estate that inspires them to create a work of art to occupy it. Gradually over the years, a remarkable site has emerged. After Richard Serra came Sean Scully, Andy Goldsworthy, Frank Gehry, Tom Shannon, Tunga, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Guggi, Tatsuo Miyajima, Liam Gillick, Jean- Michel Othoniel, Michael Stipe, Paul Matisse, Larry Neufeld, Tracey Emin, and more recently Lee Ufan. There are also emblematic works by Louise Bourgeois, Alexander Calder and Franz West set in a decor of stone walls, former navigation channels, paved pathways and a beautiful oak forest. The beautifully reproduced photographs in this book offer a glimpse of this estate, where art and wine cohabit in harmony.

American Solitudes
American Solitudes
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  5660  

Over the course of a decade, French photographer Jean-Luc Bertini traveled the length and breadth of the United States, creating portraits of the unique circumstance of isolation fostered by the country’s geographic circumstances and its espousal of an individualist ethos. Bertini casts his subjects against the vast backdrops of the country, exploring all the nuances of isolation, from solitude to loneliness. This perspective produces an usual and fresh take on America as a nation. In his preface, Richard Ford, author of The Sportswriter, Independence Day, The Lay of the Land and Let Me Be Frank With You, focuses on the physiognomies of solitude in America: “Looking at his work, we build up an idea of the unique character of American solitudes, in non-binary terms, in which what is ours does not only belong to us.”

Sol Lewitt
Sol Lewitt
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  2606  

The famed Lambert Collection in Avignon owns more than 30 works by American conceptualist Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), that together constitute a concise account of his evolution. This concise, elegantly produced volume documents these works, as well as LeWitt’s longstanding relationship with the collection. An interview between Yvon Lambert, the Collection’s founder, a selection of illustrations and installation images from a 2018 exhibition of the Lambert Collection’s LeWitt holdings provide a summary of this important association for this key figure in postwar American art.

Van Gogh: Colours of the North, Colours of the South
Van Gogh: Colours of the North, Colours of the South
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  3803  

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) discovered Eugene Delacroix's theories of color in Nuenen, in the Brabant, where he worked from 1883 to 1885. His work began to truly evolve in Paris, where he continued to study the work of Delacroix and the Impressionists. This publication provides a historical overview of van Gogh's development as a colorist and his influences, including his brief friendship with Paul Gauguin.

Vincent van Gogh: Drawings
Vincent van Gogh: Drawings
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  3153  

Vincent van Gogh (1853-90) started his artistic career by concentrating on drawing. Convinced that this was the foundation he needed to become a painter, he did little else for the first three years of his career. He was a talented drauftsman long before he became an experienced painter, and drawing would remain an integral part of all his subsequent artistic activities. Published to accompany an exhibition at the Vincent van Gogh Foundation in Arles, Van Gogh Drawings includes more than 30 of the artist's prints and drawings. This volume also pays special attention to the influences that shaped van Gogh's graphic work, and features a range of images that inspired van Gogh at specific points in his practice. These include prints and images from illustrated magazines which van Gogh collected and which strongly influenced his early work, and replicas of 17th-century prints and Japanese prints which inspired his remarkable reed pen drawings made in Provence. Van Gogh absorbed a multitude of influences and merged them in works that were highly innovative in style and often also in technique, producing one of the most remarkable drawn oeuvres of the 19th century.

Vik Muniz: Imaginaria
Vik Muniz: Imaginaria
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  2593  

As part of Grand Arles Express, with which the Lambert Collection has been associated since its inception in 2016, the famous Brazilian artist Vik Muniz returns to the papal city eight years after his major solo show to present Imaginaria, a series of works that have never been seen in Europe. Exhibited at the Lambert Collection, it comprises fifteen photographs featuring saints as depicted by great artists, from Simon Vouet’s Saint Agnes to Philippe de Champaigne’s Saint Augustine and Jose de Ribera’s Saint Sebastian. In this new series, Muniz continues his exploration of the fascination with saints through the history of their representation in art and, consequently, the relationship between art works and the idea of the sacred. Composed of installations using everyday objects in incongruous situations (wire, sugar, ketchup, toys and cut-out magazines), Vik Muniz’s photography reproduces images from collective memory and questions the notions of originality and copies. By audaciously re-appropriating icons of art history and the media world, the artist proposes a new relationship to images whose meaning and originality seems to have been exhausted by their reproduction and global diffusion.

Simon Velez: Vegetarian Architecture
Simon Velez: Vegetarian Architecture
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  4869  

Simon Velez was born in Manizales, Colombia, in 1949, and began his career forty years ago. Velez is renowned for his joinery systems that brilliantly utilize bamboo as a permanent structural element in both residential and commercial structures. For four consecutive years he has been invited by the Vitra Design Museum and the George Pompidou Centre to conduct workshops in France in which structures of bamboo-guadua were built as an instructive exercise. In this monograph, illustrated by Deidi von Schaewens photographs, Pierre Frey offers us a rare insight into the works of this architect. Throughout the book, texts and images introduce us to a panorama of constructions as well as to the architects idiosyncratic construction techniques, which are part of a vernacular architecture that the author considers as symptomatic of the state of the world and societies populating it. Whether he is working with concrete, steel or other forms of wood, he works in the same way. He energetically defends his status as bambousero and is skilled at distinguishing materials and assigning them functions in accordance with their performances. He has persuaded his richest clients to build luxury residences from the material most used by simple peasants. He has also managed to convince many large public administrations, town council or businesses concerned about the environmental impact of their activities to adopt and promote guadua bamboo.

Louise Bourgeois
Louise Bourgeois
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  3421  

Reviewing Louise Bourgeois' monumental 2007-2008 traveling retrospective during its stop at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, The New York Times' Holland Cotter wrote, for Bourgeois, "art is not a job; it is a life. It is what you do when you get up in the morning, and what you continue to do all day, through headaches and phone calls, breakups and breakdowns, silences and celebrations. It is what you keep doing after dark, and when you can't sleep at night... She is an art-world presence, a personality and a loquacious one, ever ready to share her history." This volume, an absolute treasure put together by the French artist Makhi Xenakis, takes the reader back to Bourgeois' childhood haunts. It includes documentary and family photographs from the artist's youth, as well as reproductions of artworks that are traced to specific times and places during her life. Short texts accompany each image and Bourgeois' comments and explanations run throughout.

The Secret Language of Flowers
The Secret Language of Flowers
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  4448  

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Louvre pyramid, Jean-Michel Othoniel was invited to create a work relating the importance of flowers in the Museum’s eight art departments. The artist photographed the floral wealth concealed in the masterpieces of the Museum’s painting, drawing, sculpture, embroidery and enamel collections. Using this, Othoniel composes his own original herbarium, accompanied with notes on the secret language of flowers and their symbolism in the history of art. Among the seventy details of flowers, you will find the thistle in Durer’s selfportrait, the poppy in the Paros funerary stele, the apple sitting on a stool in The Lock by Fragonard, or the peony attached to the unfastened blouse of the young woman in Greuze’s Broken Pitcher. The work also introduces us to lesser-known details in works, offering a magnificent treasure hunt for visitors of the museum. Amid this vast prairie spangled with symbolic flowers, the artist asks this question: If there could be only one, which would be the Louvre’s flower? A question to which the artist himself offers his own response.

Unretouched Women
Unretouched Women
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  7241  

In the mid-1970s in the United States as feminism gained huge momentum, three American photographers Eve Arnold, Abigail Heyman and Susan Meiselas published books of a new kind. Combining testimonies and images, they offer very original documentaries of women at work, their daily routines and their private lives. The trio brought their own style and experimented with the book format while showing women in a new light through photography. Their work sidestepped cliches to create alternative representations. This catalogue reveals their unusual approach to their works. The first, Growing Up Female by Abigail Heyman, published in 1974, is a kind of feminist personal diary. The photographer casts a lucid eye at her own life and questions the imprisonment of women in stereotype roles. The second, The Unretouched Woman, published by Eve Arnold in 1976, shows unknown women and celebrities in unexpected moments of their daily lives. The photos were deliberately not retouched or staged and, through them, the photographer offers a heteroclite and nuanced vision of women far from the glamour of glossy magazines. The third, Carnival Strippers, published in the same year by Susan Meiselas, is the fruit of three years of investigation into fairground striptease sideshows in the north-east of the United States. Through the performers’ long testimonies, the book gives a voice to its silent subjects, depicting their work, their dreams and their ambitions. The images provide an original perspective of female bodies, revealing their invisible make-up artistry and the staging involved behind their public appearances. In doing so it reveals a surprising, previously unseen glimpse into their sometimes prosaic, sometimes harsh private lives. It also reveals the social conventions and norms defining the status of women in society, within couples or within the domestic space to reveal working women, striving for independence and freedom.